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National Journal of Maxillofacial Surgery
 
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 72-77

Surgical outcomes in oral cancer involving the central arch of the mandible in elderly patients: An institutional experience


1 Department of Surgical Oncology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Radiation Oncology, MPMMCC and HBCH, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Department of Pathology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
4 Department of Radiation Oncology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
5 Department of Anesthesiology, Era's Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Naseem Akhtar
Department of Surgical Oncology, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njms.NJMS_114_20

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Backgrounds: Oral squamous cell cancer (SCC) is one of the most common cancers. The most common age of presentation is fifth to sixth decade. Management of this disease is dictated by stage, age, and related comorbidities. Elderly patients have their own set of limitations as far as their management is concerned. Carcinoma involving central mandibular arch is a challenging disease for surgeons, especially in the elderly. This article describes our experience with the surgical treatment of oral cancer involving the central arch of the mandible in elderly patients. Methods: Forty elderly (≥60 years) patients with histologically proven SCC of the oral cavity in which disease was involving the central arch of the mandible, were included in our study. Demographic, clinical, and treatment-related factors were recorded. The outcome was assessed in terms of postoperative complications, recurrence, and patient survival. Results: The median age of the patients was 63 years. The male:female ratio was 7:3. A history of oral tobacco use was present in 95% of patients. The most common site of disease was lower alveolus (80%) followed by carcinoma of the lower lip (20%). Majority of our patients (77.3% [30]) were having Stage IV disease. Mandibulectomy was either segmental (62.5%) or marginal (37.5%). Bilateral neck dissection (37/40, 92.5%) was done in most patients. Among all patients, 62.5% (25) received adjuvant radiotherapy. The local recurrence rate after a median follow-up of 30 months was 15% (6). Two-year disease-free survival and overall survival were 89% and 90%, respectively. Conclusion: Central arch of the mandible is a difficult disease to treat. It needs a complex and lengthy reconstructive procedure. Comorbidities such as extreme age, diabetes, and pulmonary and cardiac illnesses make it more challenging to manage. With the proper evaluation of comorbidities and avoiding long, cumbersome procedures, we can provide patients a fairly good chance of survival.


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